SHOVE vs SOR (SH)

The SHOVE module is convenient anytime we want to know the EV of getting the rest of our stack in - with or without fold equity. This can be useful in a variety of situations as we shall see in the examples below.

The SHOVE module is split into two scenarios:

  • SHOVE vs SOR (vs. Stack-Off Range)
  • SHOVE with PR (with Perceived Range)

In this article we will look at SHOVE vs SOR.

As the name suggests the first thing we need to do is to define a stack-off range for Villain. In other words the range of hands that we expect Villain to also get the money in with when we shove.

Note: The module assumes that stacks go in if Villain is not folding. Calling to see the next street is not an option.

Once we have defined a stack-off range (SOR) for Villain the module will then calculate:

1) How often Villain will stack off when Hero shoves

2) How often Villain will fold when Hero shoves

3) Hero's equity when called by Villain

4) Hero's EV of shoving against defined stack-off range


The results will look similar to this:

Frequencies (bars)

1) The left bar tells us how often Villain will stack off when Hero shoves (53.04%).

2) The right bar tells us how often Villain will fold when Hero shoves (46.96%).

 

Equities (circles)

3) The circles show how much equity Hero has against each of Villain's ranges. In this example Hero has 62% against Villain's stack-off range (when we get the money in) and 78% against his folding range.

 

Expected Value

4) The module combines frequencies and equities to calculate the expected value of shoving. The results is displayed at the top of the module:

That's it! Let's do a few examples. All examples can be downloaded to PokerJuice.

 

Example #1

Let's start with a classic example. We are playing heads-up and Villain 3bets us preflop. We call with a nice hand and flop very well. Villains cbets and the decision is now on us:

To analyze this situation we need to complete a series of steps:

1) Determine Villain's range preflop

2) Determine Villain's range for cbetting on the flop

3) Determine the range we expect Villain to stack off with if we shove.

 

Let's get right to it:

1) Determine Villain's range preflop

We are playing heads-up and what we know about this Villain is that he is tight aggressive from the big blind. We expect him to 3bet around 12% from the BB. We select the PJ 3bet oop 12% range.

2) Determine Villain's range for cbetting on the flop

This can be a bit complicated to figure out. For the sake of simplicity in this example we will just assume that Villain cbets his entire range on the flop. Since ranges are filtered street by street in PokerJuice, all we have to do is leave the flop field blank. Alternatively we can enter * to explicitly describe the entire range.

Note: We cannot use percentages postflop. For instance, we cannot enter 100% here.

3) Determine the range we expect Villain to stack off with if we shove.

Last step is to determine the range of hands we expect Villain to stack off with if we decide to shove. To describe this range we will use the PJ Syntax. We think that he will stack off with something along the lines of:

  • Any two pair or better (T6+)
  • All other overpairs with at least a gutshot or flushdraw (QQ+:(78+,dd))
  • All King high flush draws or better (Kdd+)
  • All flush draws with a board pair or a decent gut-shot (dd:(J,T,6,Q8+))
  • All nut open-enders with a board pair or a flush draw (KQ:(dd,J,T,6))

Knowing what hands are reasonable stack-off hands takes a bit of experience but there is no quicker way to build feel for this than with PokerJuice (Articles on how to build stack-off ranges are in the making).

So, our combined stack-off range for Villain looks like:

T6+,QQ+:(78+,dd),Kdd+,dd:(J,T,6,Q8+),KQ:(dd,J,T,6)

We open the SHOVE vs SOR module and enter the stack-off range:

 We click the Play button and results are:

We stand to have about 50% fold equity in this spot (If we think this is too much we could be right, but then we need to rework our ranges).

EV Shove: $30.64

The total EV of the play turns out to be $30.64. Not surprising that we have a high expectation with this hand on this particular flop.

Let's jump right ahead to the next example.

 

Example #2

Let's take a look at the situation from Villain's point of view and how he can utilize the SHOVE vs SOR module. We switch perspective and look at the flop decision from the eyes of the BB:

We have assigned BB a nice hand that would be in his 3betting range. Let's see how the BB can utilize the SHOVE vs SOR module.

The flop is not great for BB. He still has unimproved Aces along with a backdoor flush draw and a backdoor straight draw.

As the BB we can either bet or check. If we bet and get raised we can then either call or fold. And if we check and SB bets we can either raise, call or fold. To evaluate our options let's start by evaluating the bet/call option.

But what does bet/calling mean? It means that we bet and sometimes we pick up the pot right away while the rest of the time we get raised and we get stacks in. So, even before betting we have made the decision to commit our stack.

We can use SHOVE vs SOR to model this situation. To do this, again we need to complete a series of steps:

1) Determine Villain's range preflop

2) Determine Villain's range for raising our cbet

Again, we are ignoring Villain's option to just call our cbet (but we will address that in the conclusion).

Let's complete the steps:

1) Determine Villain's range preflop

We are playing a heads-up match where Villain is raising almost every button. He is folding a couple of hands to 3bets but not many. He is also 4betting a reasonable tight range. We decide on:

2) Determine Villain's range for raising our cbet

Villain is very aggressive on the flop. He tends to never slowplay and shove many hands that most players just flat call. We expect him to raise with:

  • Any two pair or better (T6+)
  • All overpairs with an open-ended or flushdraw (QQ+:(98+,dd))
  • All Nut flush draws (Add)
  • All flush draws with a board pair or a decent gut-shot (dd:(J,T,6,Q8+))
  • All open-enders with a board pair or a flush draw (98+:(dd,J,T,6))

Villain's combined raising range is then:

T6+,QQ+:(98+,dd),Add,dd:(J,T,6,Q8+),98+:(dd,J,T,6)

We enter this as Villain's stack-off range:

NB! Since we are evaluating our bet/call option it is imperative that we execute the SHOVE module before we make the cbet (see replayer screenshot above).

We execute and we get results:

EV Shove: $-.1.58

What we see is that we can expect Villain to raise us 49.11% of the time. When he does raise us we stand to have 35% against his range. 

We are also told that Villain folds 50.89% of the time to our cbet. However, as mentioned previously we are ignoring Villain's option to just call our cbet so in reality this number will be lower. To figure out how often Villain folds to our cbet would require defining his entire continuation range and use Range Distribution, but that is a whole other topic.

So, bet/calling is not such an attractive option here. But for the sake of this example let's have Hero cbet anyway and let's also have Villain raise:

If we look at the the table stats above the replayer we can see that now when we get raised we need 39.50% to call it off. However, recall that we only had 35% against his raising range. So, if we did choose to cbet we would have to bet/fold. This situation brings us to the third an final example of how to utilize the SHOVE vs SOR module.

Example #3

We continue in this example from where we left off in Example #2. Hero chose to cbet the flop and is now facing a committing raise. Let's look at how Hero can utilize the SHOVE vs SOR module in this situation.

Again we need to complete a couple of steps:

1) Determine Villain's range for raising our cbet

2) Determine Villain's range for stacking off if we shove.

Luckily, we have done most of the work already.

1) Determine Villain's range for raising our cbet

In example #2 we defined Villain's range for raising our cbet as:

T6+,QQ+:(98+,dd),Add,dd:(J,T,6,Q8+),98+:(dd,J,T,6)

Fact is, that Villain has now raised us. So, now instead of this being a stack-off range of some unknown probability it is now his actual range. We know that he has a hand in this range. Otherwise, he would not have raised. So we take what was previously our stack-off range and move it into Villain's flop range:

We can do a small combo check and we see that this accounts for 49.11% of his preflop range. Exactly what the SHOVE module told us to expect in Example #2.

2) Determine Villain's range for stacking off if we shove.

Since we don't expect Villain to fold any hands once he has raised to pot his stack-off range will be his entire range:

That's it. We can now run the SHOVE module. And results are:

EV Shove: $-.9.90

We can see that Villain never folds as expected. And like in the previous example we have 35% against his range. We also saw in Example #2 that we needed 39.50% to stack-off. The fact that we only have 35% means that we lose $9.90.

 

Conclusion

We have seen three different situations where we can utilize the SHOVE vs SOR module. As mentioned the module assumes that stacks get in and calling is not an option. 

I hope this article was useful. Please do not hesitate to contact us. You can find me on Skype or in the PokerJuice Community.

Morten
Skype: PokerJuice
PJC: morten.pokerjuice.com
Web: pokerjuice.com

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